What is Acne?

Acne is a skin condition that causes blemishes. This includes whiteheads, blackheads, papules, pustules (what many people call pimples), nodules, and cysts.
Acne occurs when pores on the surface of the skin become clogged.



  • Each pore opens to a follicle. A follicle contains a hair and an oil gland. The oil released by the gland helps remove old skin cells and keeps your skin soft.
  • When glands produce too much oil (lots of sebum), the pores can become blocked. Dirt, P. Acne bacteria, and dead skin cells build up together inside the pore. Inside the pore, the bacteria have a perfect environment for multiplying very quickly. With loads of bacteria inside, the pore becomes inflamed (red and swollen). If the inflammation goes deep into the skin, an acne cyst or nodule appears. The blockage is called a plug or comedone.
  • If the top of the plug is white, it is called a whitehead.
  • If the top of the plug is dark, it is called a blackhead.
  • If the plug breaks open, swelling and red bumps occur (papules, pustules, nodules).
  • Acne can cause cysts, scars, and hyper-pigmentations.

Acne appears on the face but it can appear on other areas of the body. Acne can appear on the back, chest, neck, shoulders, upper arms, and buttocks.

Acne is most common in teenagers, but anyone can get acne.

Hormonal changes may cause the skin to become more oily.

Acne tends to run in families .This suggests that some people may have a genetic predisposition to acne.

Call us today and schedule a free VISIA® Complexion Analysis with Dr Phanor Calle a Board Certified Aesthetic Medicine Physician.

VISIA® starts with a digital photograph of your face which Dr Calle can use to document the condition of your skin and evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment options available to you. The system generates comprehensive reports to add to your record and with which to track your progress to a healthier, more youthful looking complexion.

Adult acne can be particularly frustrating,  women are more susceptible . Acne can persist well into one’s 30s, 40s, and even 50s. Often causing deep-seated, tender, inflamed pimples and nodules, this type of acne is more common in women. Even those who have never had acne get late-onset acne. For some women, acne becomes a problem during menopause. Persistent acne tends to form on the lower face, predominately around the mouth, on the chin, and along the jawline.

Treatment that worked so well during adolescence often is ineffective. Over-the-counter topical medications tend to irritate the skin, making acne worse. Some women try numerous treatments without success.

It may be triggered by:

  • Hormonal swings related to puberty, menstrual periods, pregnancy, menopause, and birth control pills.
  • Some women get acne when they stop taking birth control pills. The pills may have been keeping their acne at bay.
  • Greasy or oily products used on hair and skin: Some products such as oily sunscreens and hair greases promote a type of acne called acne cosmetica. When buying products to be used on the skin or hair, look for ones labeled “non-comedogenic” or “non-acnegenic.” This means that they are less likely to cause acne.
  • Certain drugs: Other drugs that may trigger acne are steroids, testosterone, estrogen, and anticonvulsants such as phenytoin. Birth control pills that contain estrogen and progestins often help control acne in women. When a birth control pill contains only progestins, it may make acne worse.
  • High levels of humidity and sweating.
  • Stress: In response to stress, the body produces more androgens (a type of hormone). These hormones stimulate the oil glands and hair follicles in the skin. When over-stimulated, such as during times of stress, acne can flare.
  • Family history of acne. In one study, researchers found that 50% of the adults with acne had a first-degree relative (parent, sibling, or child) who had acne. This suggests that some people may have a genetic predisposition to acne.acne treatments

Research does not show that chocolate, nuts, and greasy foods cause acne. However, diets high in refined sugars may be related to acne.

Products alone will not solve your problem. You also need an acne expert’s guidance.

Call us today and schedule a free VISIA® Complexion Analysis with Dr Phanor Calle a Board Certified Aesthetic Medicine Physician.

VISIA® starts with a digital photograph of your face which Dr Calle can use to document the condition of your skin and evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment options available to you. The system generates comprehensive reports to add to your record and with which to track your progress to a healthier, more youthful looking complexion.

You have natural oil in your pores called sebum which is what the acne bacteria feed on. An increase in hormonal activity and/or stress can cause an increase in sebum production. This causes your acne to get worse in two ways. It increases the number of pores that get clogged; and it creates a bigger food source for the bacteria.

Some foods, especially foods high in iodides, i.e. salty foods, sushi, some seafood can actually irritate the follicle walls and make acne worse.

What if my skin is very sensitive?

We have patients  with very sensitive skin. We will only give you treatments and skin care products that you can tolerate.

Will my acne ever go away?

You will probably have to continue to treat your acne to keep it under control for a while. It’s different for everyone, but some people need to continue treatment for years. Eventually, your pores will burn out, not produce as much sebum and will no longer have a habit of getting clogged, but no-one knows when that happens.

Sometimes I get a real big pimple in an obvious place and I feel that I’ve got to squeeze it to make it go away more quickly. Is that OK?

No. Every time you pick or squeeze at your skin you are taking a chance on spreading the bacteria, infecting the lesion and creating a permanent future scar. So it is much more likely that instead of making it go away quicker, you will actually make it worse and last longer. When you break the skin and it forms a scab, that will cause a red mark that can last for months .

Acne treatments: Medical procedures may help clear skin

Medical procedures, such as Microneedling (Dr Dermic® Pen)  or chemical peels, may help clear stubborn acne and Acne Sacrs . Learn more about these acne treatments.

Acne treatments aren’t a one-size-fits-all commodity. If prescription creams and antibiotics aren’t working for you — or if you can’t tolerate the side effects these medications can cause — you might consider acne treatments that can be provided at Weston Medical Clinic @ Cosmetic Center.

Ranging from blue-light therapy to chemical peels, several types of office-based medical procedures have been found to be effective acne treatments for many people.

Regardless of which acne treatments you use, try to keep your expectations realistic. Acne can’t be cured, only controlled. You won’t start seeing improvements from most treatments for four to eight weeks, and your acne might appear worse before it gets better.

Call us today and schedule a free VISIA® Complexion Analysis with Dr Phanor Calle a Board Certified Aesthetic Medicine Physician.

VISIA® starts with a digital photograph of your face which Dr Calle can use to document the condition of your skin and evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment options available to you. The system generates comprehensive reports to add to your record and with which to track your progress to a healthier, more youthful looking complexion.

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Acne Treatments

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